Dihydroxyacetone

 

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Dihydroxyacetone

Dihydroxyacetone is an aliphatic ketone.

This ingredient may be derived from animals. From PETA's Caring Consumer: Pigments from animal, plant, and synthetic sources used to color foods, cosmetics, and other products. Cochineal is from insects. Widely used FD&C and D&C colors are coaltar (bituminous coal) derivatives that are continously tested on animals due to their carcinogenic properties. Alternatives: grapes, beets, turmeric, saffron, carrots, chlorophyll, annatto, alkanet.

Function(s): Colorant; Skin-Conditioning Agent - Miscellaneous; Reducing; Skin Conditioning; Tanning

Other names: 1,3-Dihydroxy 2-Propanone; 1,3-Dihydroxy-2-Propanone; 1,3-Dihydroxyacetone; 1,3-Dihydroxydimethyl Ketone; 2-Propanone, 1,3-Dihydroxy; 2Propanone, 1,3Dihydroxy; Dihydroxyacetone; 1,3-Dihydroxy-2-Propanone; 1,3-Dihydroxyacetone; 1,3-Dihydroxypropanone; Chromelin; Dihyxal

Source:  EWG

Source: EWG

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Natural or synthetic?

Natural

What Is It?

Dihydroxyacetone is a white crystalline powder. In cosmetics and personal care products, Dihydroxyacetone is used in the formulation of self-tanning products.

Why is it used in cosmetics and personal care products?

Dihydroxyacetone imparts a color to the human body. It also enhances the appearance of dry or damaged skin by reducing flaking and restoring suppleness.

Safety Information: 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists Dihydroxyacetone as a color additive exempt from certification. It may be safely used in externally applied cosmetics "intended solely or in part to impart a color to the human body" provided that it conforms to FDA specifications. Dihydroxyacetone may also be used in externally applied drugs. Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) has deferred evaluation of this ingredient because the safety has been assessed by FDA. This deferral of review is according to the provisions of the CIR Procedures.

More safety Information: 

All color additives used in foods, drugs and cosmetics in the United States must be approved by FDA and listed in the Code of Federal Regulations. In some cases, FDA requires that each batch of color produced for use in regulated products can be used only if it is certified by the agency to meet strict specifications. FDA maintains a laboratory especially for this purpose and color manufacturers must pay a fee to support this activity. FDA only approves colors after extensive review of all safety data and publication of the basis for its approval in the Federal Register.

FDA comments regarding sunless tanner products 

Link to FDA Code of Federal Regulations for Dihydroxyacetone

In Europe, Dihydroxyacetone is treated as a cosmetic ingredient rather than as a colorant. Dihydroxyacetone may be used in cosmetics and personal care products marketed in Europe according to the general provisions of the Cosmetics Regulation of the European Union.

More about the regulation and labeling of colors.

Source

 
 
DNoéma Editor