Rosehip Oil (Rosa Canina) Seed Oil

 

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Rosehip Oil (Rosa Canina) Seed Oil

Other names: Dog Rose Seed Oil; Rosa Canina Seed Oil; Rosa Canina (Dog Rose) Seed Oil

Source:  EWG

Source: EWG

Overall hazard:
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Cancer concerns:
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Developmental & reproductive toxicity: ○○○○○○○○○○○○ 
Allergies & immunotoxicity:
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Use restrictions:
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Natural or synthetic?

Natural

What Is It?

The oil contains provitamin A (mostly beta-Carotene). It has been wrongly said to contain retinol (vitamin A) which is a vitamin solely made by animals from provitamin A. It does however contain levels (up to .357 ml/L) of tretinoin or all-trans retinoic acid, a vitamin A acid that retinol converts to.[1]

Similarly, while the fruit is rich in vitamin C, the oil does not contain any, as it is a water-soluble vitamin.

Rose hip seed oil is high in the essential fatty acidslinoleic acid or omega-6, and linolenic acid or omega-3.

Why is it used in cosmetics and personal care products?

Prized since ancient times for its valuable healing benefits, rosehip oil is loaded with skin-nourishing vitamins and essential fatty acids. It also contains phenols that have been shown to have antiviral, antibacterial, and antifungal properties. Rosehip oil is often used as a carrier oil for essential oils which are too intense to put on your skin directly.

Rosehip oil moisturises, hydrates and reduces inflammation of the skin, while also helping exfoliation, boosting collagen formation and reduces scarring.

Safety Information

Rosehip oil is generally safe for all skin types, but allergic reaction is not uncommon. Before using rosehip oil for the first time, you should perform a patch test to make sure your skin can tolerate the oil.

 
 
RNoéma Editor